Two short weeks ago, we announced that, on January 29, 2023, 9 Regional hosts would open their venues for the IATF Regionals Tournaments - a highly anticipated day of global competition happening in your backyard. And, the excitement continues to mount as registration opens on November 1st, 2022! So mark that date in your calendar and be sure to register early!

These competitions pave the way to the International Axe Throwing Championships, and this year has been made even more exciting with the addition of an automatic entry into Round 2 of the International Axe Throwing Champion’s Wilson Cup for Regionals winners.

As promised, here are the rest of the details! But first, if you missed the dates and the 9 Regionals Hosts announcement, you can catch up on these details here.

Where and When You Can Register to Compete

Registration opens November 1st, 2022, at 2 PM ET

Registration for all Regional Tournaments, happening on January 29th, 2023, will be managed through the IATF this year in order to streamline the entire process. On November 1, 2022, from 2 pm, you can register through our website, at www.iatf.com. We will put out an updated social post with all the venues and their registration links when registration opens. Registration will also be available via accessible links on the home page or via the tournament page (clicking on “Tournaments” in the main navigation bar).

Tournament Registration Fees and Value

Registration Fees are set at $80 USD

All Regionals Tournament registration fees are set at $80 USD, and 50% of all registration fees, collected, for each tournament will go toward the CASH prize pools at that tournament. Each tournament will have a prize pool payout for the top 8 throwers. And, as indicated above, the first-place finisher in each tournament will receive an automatic spot in 2023 Round 2 of the Wilson Cup (more details below).

Pool Play Round Robin Format - Followed By Single Elimination

Back by popular demand, this year's IATF Regionals tournaments at the 9 Host locations will be following a Pool Play Round Robin format. This format, by design, gives players more matches and better value. It further strengthens the competitive opportunities by guaranteeing each thrower 3 matches, with a minimum of 50% of competitors playing in at least 4 matches.

How does Pool Play Work?


This format starts with a group stage, with all players divided into groups of 3 and 4 depending on the tournament size. Each player will throw 3 matches within the group in a 3 out of 5 round match format before any elimination takes place. Once all Group Stage matches are complete, the top 2 throwers from each group move onto a single elimination tournament bracket.

Guaranteed Wilson Cup Round 2 Entry

As detailed in the original announcement post, all ‘Regionals’ first-place winners will receive the prize money, and the coveted “skip the line” guaranteed spot in Round 2 of the 2023 International Axe Throwing Championships Wilson Cup in Toronto, Canada.

While anyone can participate and win these Regional Tournaments and the prize money and accolades they come with, the guaranteed Round 2 entry is only applicable to IATF throwers who have competed in an IATF-sanctioned league season (Standard or Premier Ruleset League) between March 12, 2022, and Jan 28, 2023. As a further reminder, as last year’s Wilson Cup winner has already received a guaranteed spot in Round 2, they cannot take advantage of this additional placement prize. If a winner doesn’t meet the requirements for this guaranteed entry per the details above, it will be given to the next eligible winner (second place, third place, and so on).

REMINDER: Any player who wins a Round 2 entry into the Wilson Cup must still also compete in Round 1 for seeding purposes.

If you’re looking to plan out the rest of your road to the International Axe Throwing Championships, make sure you bookmark the IATC Dates Announcement and review the last Regionals Announcements.

We’re looking forward to watching all the competitions during regionals, and we wish you all the best of luck!

As always, if you have any additional questions, please send them to info@iatf.com, and we will get back to you.

VIEW RULEBOOK PAGE

IATF REGIONALS ARE COMING!

The countdown has begun! It’s been four months since 256 competitors from all 9 IATF Regions came together to celebrate community, competition, and the best axe throwers in the world at the 2022 International Axe Throwing Championships in Toronto; only four months since we bestowed the Wilson Cup and the title of World’s Best Axe Thrower to Dave Cycon. Now, we’re looking to see how the competitive field will be shaped for 2023. Who will be the next champion?

We’re excited to start announcing details about the IATF Regionals Tournaments. The IATF Regionals are a set of nine tournaments held on a single day across the IATF regions of the world. Regionals have always come with the opportunity to compete with the best, win prize money, and make your name and skills known throughout the world. This year, the stakes are even higher with the addition of a guaranteed qualification for Round 2 of the International Axe Throwing Championship’s Wilson Cup. This is the same for all nine tournament winners.

In this first post, we outline the core details of this highly anticipated set of tournaments: the dates, entry and winning requirements, and of course, the venues sanctioned to host in their regions. More importantly, stay tuned to our socials and website, over the next few weeks, for more announcements detailing: registration fees, how to register and reserve your spot in the regional tournament of your choice, the tournament format, and more. Please also refer to the FAQ section for answers to all the common questions.

TOURNAMENT HOSTS & DATES:

Review the details below to determine which axe-throwing venue is hosting your regional tournament this year. For any questions on how regions are setup, please review the following link: https://internationalaxethrowingfederation.com/regions/

REGION

MEMBER

CITY

DATE

WEST

TRUE NORTH

LETHBRIDGE, AB

CANADA

January 29, 2023

SOUTHWEST

LA Ax

Los Angeles, CA
USA

January 29, 2023

SOUTH

Urban Axes

Austin, TX
USA

January 29, 2023

CENTRAL

Detroit Axe

Detroit, MI

USA

January 29, 2023

EAST

Ace Axe

Pittsburgh, PA
USA

January 29, 2023

SOUTHEAST

BATL LoSo

Charlotte, NC

USA

January 29, 2023

NORTHEAST

BATL Port Lands

Toronto, ON

CANADA

January 29, 2023

PACIFIC

Maniax

SYDNEY, NSW

AUSTRALIA

January 29, 2023

EUROPEAN

SKEETERS

London, ENG
UNITED KINGDOM

January 29, 2023

ELIGIBILITY AND PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

While these tournaments and their prize money are open to anyone, eligibility to participate in the International Axe Throwing Championships and the Wilson Cup, as well as entry into Rounds 1 & 2 of the IATC Wilson Cup, require that a player has completed at least one official IATF league (Standard or Premier ruleset) qualifying season. This includes the new Marathon Leagues format. Recreational leagues do not qualify.

FAQS

Am I Restricted To Throwing In My League’s Region?


No, you are not restricted to any specific regional tournament. Throwers are welcome to register and throw in any single regional tournament.

What Will The Prizes Be?


There are 9 Regional Tournaments, and the First Place winner of each region will receive a guaranteed Qualification to Round 2 of the IATC Wilson Cup. On top of that, each regional tournament will have a prize pool, reflecting 50% of the registration fees, and will pay out the top 8 places.

Can Anyone Participate Even If They Don’t Qualify For The IATC?


Yes, anyone can participate and play for the prize pools. However, as specified, players must have participated in an IATF Sanctioned League (Standard or Premier Ruleset) to win guaranteed qualification for Round 2 of the IATC Wilson Cup. In the event that a non-qualifying player wins their tournament, the Round 2 entry would immediately pass onto the next qualifying winner in order (to the second place winner as long as they qualify and the third place winner if they do not.).

What Happens If a Non-IATF Qualifying Thrower Wins Their Regional Tournament?


As stated above, anyone can participate and win the prize money. However, in the event that a non-qualifying player wins their tournament, the Round 2 entry would immediately pass onto the next qualifying winner in order (to the second place winner as long as they qualify and the third place winner if they do not.).

Will The First Place Winners Skip Round 1 of the Wilson Cup?


No. Winners that automatically qualify for Round 2 of the IATC Wilson Cup must still participate in Round 1 for seeding purposes, but their qualification for Round 2 is still guaranteed.

What Is The Cutoff Date For Completing A Sanctioned League Season?


To be eligible for the automatic qualification for an IATC Round 2 spot, a player must have completed a qualifying IATF league between March 12, 2022, and January 28th, 2023.

How Were Host Venues Selected?


Venues were selected, among all IATF Member organizations, based on their central location in their regions. Specifically, the IATF calculated the concentration of throwers in each region and matched that with a venue that represents a central location to support the necessary size of the tournaments.

What Happens If Last Year's IATC Wilson Cup Winner Takes First Place?


The winner of the IATC 2022 Wilson Cup was already awarded an automatic qualification to round 2 of this year’s championships. As such, they are ineligible to win another Round 2 qualification. In the event that they win their Regional Tournament, the Round 2 qualification spot would immediately pass onto the next qualifying winner in order (to the second place winner as long as they qualify and the third place winner if they do not.).

We’ll be sharing more details in the coming weeks so stay tuned to our social and website channels, so you don’t miss out on registration, and your chance to compete for the coveted Wilson Cup by qualifying through the regional tournaments. We will be announcing details on registration fees, how to register and reserve your spot in the regional tournament of your choice, the tournament format, and more.

As always, if you have any additional questions, please send them to info@iatf.com, and we will get back to you.

VIEW RULEBOOK PAGE

Following feedback from the community, we very recently committed to enhancing and clarifying the language and the imagery for rulesets 4.1 - Axe Specifications. We are pleased to now share these enhancements.

While these rules have not gone through any additional changes, the layout, formatting, and accompanying images have been re-designed to provide more clarity on what is and what is not a legal competition throwing axe. Hatchet and Big Axe specifications have also been combined into one page of the rulebook.

These axe specifications are designed to be comprehensive and to provide everybody with the confidence to customize to best suit their needs while maintaining the integrity and entertainment value of this sport. We strongly encourage all throwers, modifiers, and manufacturers to read this newly presented document from top to bottom in order to understand the rules in their entirety.

We here at the IATF are not looking to stifle creativity, nor prescribe that you must throw ours and only our axes for competition. However, we do need to ensure that axes are fair for unified competition and the entertainment value and integrity of the sport.

We are always thankful for the direct engagement of the axe-throwing community and appreciate and encourage all your feedback on these and other rules. Should you still have any questions or feedback, you can send them directly to info@iatf.com.

A REMINDER THAT:

HATCHET DIMENSIONS THAT HAVE NOT CHANGED:

  • weight (1.5-2.5 lbs, total weight head and handle together)
  • handle length (13"-17", from knob to eye)
  • head length (5"- 7", entire length of the head from blade to butt)
  • blade length (3"- 4", entire length of the blade from toe to heel)
  • minimum head height (1.5", measured vertically, parallel to the handle)

HATCHET DIMENSIONS ADDED:

  • maximum head height (4", measured vertically, parallel to the handle)

BIG AXE DIMENSIONS THAT HAVE NOT CHANGED:

  • weight (2.75-3.75 lbs, total weight head and handle together)
  • minimum handle length (25", from knob to eye)
  • head length (6"-7.5", entire length of the head from blade to butt)
  • blade length (3.5" - 4 5/8", entire length of the blade from toe to heel)
  • minimum head height (2", measured vertically, parallel to the handle)

BIG AXE DIMENSIONS ADDED:

  • maximum handle length (32”, from knob to eye)
  • maximum head height (4 5/8", measured vertically, parallel to the handle)

We have also included clarity around what “Grossly Modified” means throughout the document.

IATF RULEBOOK CHANGES

Please click the following link to view the enhanced Rule 4.1 Axe Specifications and remember to read and understand these in their entirety. If you have any questions or require more clarity, please reach out directly via email to info@iatf.com.

We wish you all the best in your ongoing competitions!

VIEW RULEBOOK PAGE

Reference Diagrams

Parts of an axe

Parts of an axe head

1. Axe Weight Specification

1.1  Weight is defined as the total weight of the axe, including the head and handle.


Hachet

Big Axe (Felling Axe)

1.2  The minimum weight is:

1.5 lbs

680 g

2.75 lbs

1,247 g

1.3  The maximum weight is:

2.5 lbs

1,134 g

3.75 lbs

1,701 g

2. Axe Handle Specification

2.1  The handle must be made from wood.

2.2  The handle length is measured from the knob (bottom) of the handle to the eye (top) of the axe head (see Measuring the Handle).

2.3  If the handle protrudes from the eye (top) of the axe head, the protruding length is not included in the measurement of the handle length (see Measuring the Handle).


Hachet

Big Axe (Felling Axe)

2.4  The minimum handle length is:

13"

330 mm

25"

635 mm

2.5  The maximum handle length is:

17"

432 mm

32"

813 mm

Measuring the Handle

Measure the handle from the knob to the eye of the axe head.

3. Axe Head Length Specification

3.1  The head length is measured from the blade to the plane of the butt of the axe head, perpendicular to the handle (see Measuring the Head Length).

3.2 The minimum and maximum head length are required at all points over the blade edge (see Measuring the Head Length).

3.3  If the axe head features any protrusion from the butt of the axe head, the protruding length is not included in the measurement of the head length (see Measuring the Handle).


Hachet

Big Axe (Felling Axe)

3.4  The minimum head length is:

5"

127 mm

6"

152 mm

3.5  The maximum head length is:

7"

178 mm

7.5"

191 mm

Measuring the Head Length

Measurements made from the blue arrow to the green area are within the minimum and maximum lengths.

Measure the length between the plane of the butt and the blade edge, perpendicular to the handle.

Protrusions from the butt are not included in the length measurement.

Measure from butt to blade. This measurement is an acceptable length.

Measure from blade to butt. This measurement is an acceptable length

REPEAT THE MEASUREMENT OVER THE WHOLE BLADE EDGE

Measure from butt to blade. All measurements shown here are between the minimum and maximum length.

Measure from blade to butt. All measurements are between the minimum and maximum length.

All measurements shown here are above the maximum length.

All measurements shown here are below the minimum length.

4. Axe Head height Specification

4.1  The head height is measured on the face (side) of the axe head, parallel to the handle (see Measuring the Head Height).

4.2  The minimum and maximum head height are required at all points over the axe head (see Measuring the Head Height).


Hachet

Big Axe (Felling Axe)

4.3  The minimum head height is:

1.5"

38 mm

2"

51 mm

4.4  The maximum head height is:

4"

102 mm

4.625"

117 mm

Measuring the head height

Measurements made from the blue arrow to the green area are within the minimum and maximum heights.

Measure the height of the axe head parallel to the handle.

Measure from the bottom to the top of the axe head. This measurement is an acceptable height.

Measure from the top to the bottom of the axe head. This measurement is an acceptable height.

REPEAT THE MEASUREMENT OVER THE WHOLE AXE HEAD

Measure from the top to the bottom of the axe head. All measurements shown here are between the minimum and maximum height.

Measure from the bottom to the top of the axe head. All measurements shown here are between the minimum and maximum height.

Both measurements shown here are unacceptable, one is too short, the other too long.

5. Blade Length Specification

5.1  The blade length is measured from the heel to the toe of the blade (see Measuring the Blade Length).


Hachet

Big Axe (Felling Axe)

5.2  The minimum blade length is:

3"

76 mm

3.5"

89 mm

5.3  The maximum blade length is:

4"

102 mm

4.625"

117 mm

Measuring the blade length

Measurements made from the blue arrow to the green area are within the minimum and maximum lengths.

Measure from the heel to the toe of the axe head.

Measure from the heel to the toe of the axe head. This measurement is an acceptable length.

Measure from the toe to the heel of the axe head. This measurement is an acceptable length.

While this axe head may be an acceptable length and height, the blade measured from toe to heel is too long.

While this axe head may be an acceptable length and height, the blade measured from toe to heel is too short.

6. Attaching the Axe Head to the Handle

6.1  The axe head must be fixed to the handle with an eye-wedge or a pin.

6.2  "Floating" axe heads, where the head is wedged on a tapering handle, and only held on by gravity, are not allowed.

7. Axe Head Silhouette Requirements

Note: The axe head silhouette describes the shape of the axe head as viewed from the side looking at one of the faces.

7.1  The axe must be a single bit blade, meaning it has only one blade edge.

A single bit (single blade edge) is acceptable.

A double bit (two blade edges) is not acceptable.

7.2  No blade or sharpened spike may protrude from the butt (back) of the axe head.

A flat butt is acceptable.

A blade protruding from the butt is not acceptable.

A blunt protrusion from the butt is acceptable.

A spike protruding from the butt is not acceptable.

7.3  The blade must be one smooth, sharpened edge that forms a convex curve or straight line from heel to toe. This is to avoid an unfair reduction in the axe head cross section measured at the plane of the board during gameplay.

7.3a  The blade cannot be concave.

7.3b  The blade cannot have notches cut out.

7.3c  The blade cannot have multiple edges.

A convex blade edge is acceptable.

A straight blade edge is acceptable.

A concave blade edge is not acceptable.

A notch in the axe head away from the blade edge is acceptable.

A notch in the blade edge is not acceptable.

Multiple blade edges is not acceptable.

7.4  The axe head must not have any holes through the faces (sides).

No holes through the faces is acceptable.

Any holes through the faces are not acceptable.

7.5  The path along the top of the axe head from the toe of the blade must curve smoothly back to the handle without any abrupt decreases in the height of the axe head. This is to avoid an unfair reduction in the axe head cross section measured at the plane of the board during gameplay.

A head with no abrupt changes in height is acceptable.

A head with a flat profile from toe to handle is acceptable.

A head with an abrupt decrease in height is not acceptable.

7.6  The path along the bottom of the axe head from the heel of the blade must curve smoothly back to the handle without any abrupt decreases in the height of the axe head. This is to avoid an unfair reduction in the axe head cross section measured at the plane of the board during gameplay.

A head with no abrupt changes in height is acceptable.

A head with a flat profile from heel to handle is acceptable.

A head with an abrupt decrease in height is not acceptable.

7.7  The axe head cannot abruptly decrease down to the minimum height close to the blade, nor in the middle of the axe head. This is to avoid an unfair reduction in the axe head cross section measured at the plane of the board during gameplay.

7.7a  The axe head can abruptly decrease down to the minimum height within 1" of the handle.

Shown here, the decrease in height at point A is within 1" from the handle. This is acceptable.

Shown here, the decrease in height at point A is beyond 1" from the handle. This is not acceptable.

Shown here, the decrease in height at point A is well beyond 1" from the handle. This is not acceptable.

7.8  The height of the axe head just before it meets the handle cannot be the largest height measurement along the axe head between the handle and the blade.

Height at A is less than heights at B and C. This is acceptable.

Height at A is greater than at B, but still less than at C. This is acceptable, provided the height at B is greater than the minimum head height.

Height at A is greater than at B and C. This is not acceptable.

8. Axe Modification and Customization

8.1  Some modifications and customizations to the axe head and handle are explicitly allowed, provided the axe dimensions remain within the allowed physical specifications (weight, height, lengths, silhouette, see above):

8.1a  Routine blade sharpening;

8.1b  Painting the axe head or handle;

8.1c  Changing or replacing the handle;

8.1d  Adjustments to the grip of the handle. For example: tape, sanding the handle, etc.

8.1e  Decorative etching into axe handle, the butt of the axe head, or the face (side) of the axe head, away from the blade edge such that the etching does not interfere with measurement during gameplay;

8.1f  Thinning the faces (sides) of the axe head.

8.2  Some modifications and customizations to the axe head and handle are explicitly disallowed, even if the axe dimensions remain within the allowed physical specifications:

8.2a  Adding material (welding, gluing, or otherwise) to the axe head that would render its use unsafe or would confer an unfair advantage by affecting the measurement at the plane of the board for gameplay;

8.2b  Removing material (drilling, cutting, melting, or otherwise) from axe head that would render its use unsafe or would confer an unfair advantage by affecting the measurement at the plane of the board for gameplay;

8.2c  Cutting notches into the blade edge;

8.2d  Etching close the blade edge such that the etching interferes with measurement during gameplay;

8.2e  Decorations that violate the IATF Code of Conduct.

9. Referee's Final Decision

9.1  The final decision on whether an axe can be used for gameplay will be made by the on-site referees at each competition.

VIEW RULEBOOK PAGE

Big Axe (Felling Axe): 

A Big Axe (Felling Axe) has the following requirements. See image 2.2.

1. The axe must be a single bit blade, ie: no blade or sharpened spike may be protruding from the back of the axe head.

2. The axe must weigh between 2.75 and 3.75 pounds of total weight (handle included).

3. The handle must be wood, handle length must be at least 25″ including the handle in the eye of the blade.

4. The axe head must be no longer than 7.5" and no shorter than 6" and must be fixed to the handle of the axe with an eye or pin (ie: no ‘floating’ axe heads where the head itself is wedged on a tapering handle and only held there through gravity.)

5. The axe head must have a minimum height of 2” as measured parallel to the handle.

Image 2.2

1. Head Length

The axe head length must be no greater than 7.5″ and no smaller than 6” at any point from face to butt. The blade of the axe must remain true, with one smooth, sharpened edge that is a consistent length from point to point. For example, no notches cut out, cannot have multiple edges, or have one point set or angled back from the other point See image 2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.2.4, 2.2.5 and 2.2.6.

1. The blade cannot be concave, for example, preventing contact of the axe, when a tip of the axe hits the target first. See image 2.2.6.

2. The head of the axe must remain one solid piece from face to the handle. ie no parts added to or removed from the head from its original design. Any manipulation beyond sharpening the blade will be considered heavily modified and illegal. (Standard sharpening practice)

3. The axe head must retreat from the blade back to the handle of the axe in its true form without any sudden or abrupt decreases prior to reaching the handle of the axe The head cannot suddenly decrease from the maximum height down to the minimum height immediately after the blade or in the middle of the head, creating multiple edges. For example, no notches cut out, no bearded axes. See image 2.2.2.

4. The axe head height at the handle cannot be larger than any other point of the axe head from the handle to the blade except, or until the point at which the head meets the handle.

2. Handle Length

The handle length must be at least 25″, including the handle in the eye of the head. The maximum handle length 32”.

3. Head Height

The axe head height, measured parallel to the handle, must be no greater than 4 5/8” and no smaller than 2”.

4. One Solid Piece

The head of the axe must remain one solid piece from face to the handle. ie no parts added to or removed from the head from its original design. Any manipulation beyond sharpening the blade will be considered heavily modified and illegal. (Standard sharpening practice)

5. Head Truth

The axe head must retreat from the blade back to the handle of the axe in its true form without any sudden or abrupt decreases in height prior to reaching the handle of the axe. The head cannot suddenly decrease from the maximum height down to the minimum height immediately after the blade or in the middle of the head. For example: no notches cut out, no bearded axes.

6. Head at the Handle Size

The axe head height at the handle cannot be larger than any other point of the axe head from the handle to the blade except, or until the point at which the head meets the handle.

7. Blade Length

1. The blade of the axe must be no longer than 4 5/8"" and no shorter than 3.5" and must be fixed to the handle of the axe with an eye-wedge or a pin (example: no ‘floating’ axe heads where the head itself is wedged on a tapering handle and only held there through gravity.)

8.Blade Modifications

The blade of the axe must remain true, with one smooth, sharpened edge that is a consistent length from point to point. See image 2.2.1.

1. Blade cannot have notches cut out. See image 2.2.2 and 2.2.3.

2. Blade cannot have multiple edges. See image 2.2.4.

3. Blade cannot have one point set or angled back from the other point. See image 2.2.5.

Concave Blades

The blade cannot be concave, thus preventing contact of the axe, when a tip of the axe hits the target first. See image 2.2.6.

1. Blade cannot have a concave blade, preventing contact of the blade with the target. 

2. The Blade cannot have an inconsistent edge that abruptly drops creating multiple edges along the top edge of the axe head.

Image 2.2.1

Image 2.2.2

Image 2.2.3

Image 2.2.4

Image 2.2.5

Image 2.2.6

9. Acceptable Modifications

Acceptable modifications include:

1. Etching into the side of the axe head.

2. Painting the head or handle.

3. Changing the handle.

4. Adjustments to the grip of the handle. For example: tape, sanding the handle, etc.

10. Referee's Final Decision

Axes that have been modified or forged in a fashion beyond what would be considered a traditional axe shape, with the intention to manipulate the rules of the game and go against the spirit of the sport will be disqualified. At any given event, the final call on axe legality will be left in the hands of the on-site referees.

Acceptable Axe Head Examples

Unacceptable Axe Head Examples

VIEW RULEBOOK PAGE

Standard Throwing Axe (Hatchet) Requirements

1. The handle must be made from wood;

2. The axe must be a single bit blade, ie: no blade or sharpened spike may be protruding from the back of the axe head.

1. Handle length

The length must be a minimum of 13” long and cannot exceed a maximum of 17” long:

1. This measurement begins from the bottom (butt) of the handle to the top of the axe head. See Image 2.1.2;

2. If any of the handle protrudes from the top of the axe head (eye) it does not count towards the minimum or maximum handle length. See image 2.1.1;

Image 2.1 (2.1.1 & 2.1.2)

2. Weight

The axe must weigh between 1.5 and 2.5 pounds of total weight (handle included).

3. Head Length

The axe head length, measured from blade to butt, must be a minimum of 5". The maximum length is 7".

4. Head Height

The axe head height, measured parallel to the handle, must be a minimum of 1.5". The maximum height is 4”.

5. One Solid Piece

The head of the axe must remain one solid piece from face to the handle. ie no parts added to or removed from the head from its original design. Any manipulation beyond sharpening the blade will be considered heavily modified and illegal. (Standard sharpening practice)

6. Head Truth

The axe head must retreat from the blade back to the handle of the axe in its true form without any sudden or abrupt decreases prior to reaching the handle of the axe. The head cannot suddenly decrease from the maximum height down to the minimum height immediately after the blade or in the middle of the head. For example: no notches cut out, no bearded axes.

7. Head at the Handle Size

The head height at the handle cannot be larger than any other point of the axe head from the handle to the blade except, or until the point at which the head meets the handle.

8. Blade Length

1. The blade of the axe must be no longer than 4" and no shorter than 3” and must be fixed to the handle of the axe with an eye-wedge or a pin (example: no ‘floating’ axe heads where the head itself is wedged on a tapering handle and only held there through gravity.)

9.Blade Modifications

The blade of the axe must remain true, with one smooth, sharpened edge that is a consistent length from point to point. See image 2.2.1.

1. Blade cannot have notches cut out. See image 2.2.2 and 2.2.3.

2. Blade cannot have multiple edges. See image 2.2.4.

3. Blade cannot have one point set or angled back from the other point. See image 2.2.5.

Concave Blades

The blade cannot be concave, thus preventing contact of the axe, when a tip of the axe hits the target first. See image 2.2.6.

1. Blade cannot have a concave blade, preventing contact of the blade with the target. 

2. The Blade cannot have an inconsistent edge that abruptly drops creating multiple edges along the top edge of the axe head.

Image 2.2.1

Image 2.2.2

Image 2.2.3

Image 2.2.4

Image 2.2.5

Image 2.2.6

11. Acceptable Modifications

Acceptable modifications include:

1. Etching into the side of the axe head.

2. Painting the head or handle.

3. Changing the handle.

4. Adjustments to the grip of the handle. For example: tape, sanding the handle, etc.

12. Referee's Final Decision

Axes that have been modified or forged in a fashion beyond what would be considered a traditional axe shape, with the intention to manipulate the rules of the game and go against the spirit of the sport will be disqualified. At any given event, the final call on axe legality will be left in the hands of the on-site referees.

Acceptable Axe Head Examples

Unacceptable Axe Head Examples

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This post contains the dates for stages and events for the International Axe Throwing Championship for the year of 2023, including the return of Axe Prom!


More information and details regarding these events and stages will be released leading up to their respective dates, so stay tuned to the IATF website and social media to keep up to date on everything you need to know when it comes to IATC 2023!

LEAGUE QUALIFICATION PERIOD

The qualification period for IATC 2023 is March 12, 2022 to March 10, 2023.


All IATF Standard and Premier league seasons that complete their playoffs between these dates are eligible for qualification.

REGIONALS

Nine IATF Regional Tournaments will be held on Sunday January 29, 2023. 


Host venues and details will be announced once they have been confirmed.

ROUND 1

Round 1 of the International Axe Throwing Championship for 2023 will be held Sunday March 26, 2023 at all participating IATF venues worldwide.

ROUND 2

Round 1 of the International Axe Throwing Championship for 2023 will begin on Saturday June 10, 2023 and then conclude on Sunday June 11, 2023.

Axe Prom

That's right! Axe Prom will be returning next year! We will be holding this iconic (and much missed) party on June 12, 2023 to celebrate our winners and the conclusion of IATC 2023!

Still have questions? Email us at info@iatf.com.

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This post describes the paths to qualify for the 2023 International Axe Throwing Championship. 


For a more detailed discussion of how these paths have evolved over the past few years please refer to the Rules & Guidelines section 6.4 under “The Road to the IATC” titled “Qualification Paths Discussion”.

The Championship

The International Axe Throwing Championship (IATC) is an annual tournament that brings together great players from around the globe to compete for the Wilson Cup.

The tournament is divided into two Rounds. Round 1 is played at many host venues internationally. The results of Round 1 determine which competitors advance to Round 2 and determine their seeding in Round 2. The format of Round 2 is a seeded double elimination bracket, hosted in Toronto, which takes place over two days in June.

Competing in the IATC

To compete in the IATC, competitors must qualify during the Qualification Period prior to the IATC. The qualification period for IATC 2023 is March 12, 2022 to March 10, 2023.


There are two primary ways to qualify: winning selected tournaments and league performance.

Qualification via Tournaments

The previous year’s IATC Champion qualifies for the next IATC. In addition, they are guaranteed to advance to Round 2, with their seeding determined by their Round 1 results.


Each of the nine IATF Regions hosts a Regional Tournament in January. The winners of these tournaments qualify for the IATC. In addition, they are guaranteed to advance to Round 2, with their seeding determined by their Round 1 results.


Competitors who qualify via tournaments are removed from consideration for qualification via league performance.

Qualification via League Performance

IATF member organizations host qualifying league seasons (see below) throughout the Qualification Period. Any number of competitors may qualify for IATC by participating in an IATF member organization’s leagues. However, each member organization will advance a limited number of competitors to Round 2. Each member organization will have the opportunity to advance at least one competitor. Additional advancing competitors are determined by the organization’s total league participation as a percentage of the total IATF league participation.


In order to qualify, competitors must participate in at least three league seasons at one IATF member organization within the Qualification Period. These league seasons can be Standard rules or Premier rules seasons.


A competitor who finishes in the Top 8, by Champs Points (see below), in a Premier rules season qualifies for IATC. Once a competitor meets this qualification criteria, they are removed from consideration for any other league performance qualification.


A competitor who achieves an average of 70 or better in three non-concurrent seasons, Standard rules or Premier rules, hosted by one organization, qualifies for IATC. Once a competitor meets this qualification criteria, they are removed from consideration for Standard rules league performance qualification.


A competitor who finishes in the Top 4, by Champs Points (see below), in a Standard rules season qualifies for IATC.


All qualifiers via league performance compete in Round 1. The results of Round 1 determine which competitors advance to Round 2 and determine their seeding in Round 2.

What is considered a qualifying league season?

Players are considered for IATC qualification if the league seasons in which they participate meet all the following criteria:

  1. The season is hosted by an IATF member organization in good standing
  2. The season is not designated as Recreational
  3. The season is played using either IATF Standard or IATF Premier rulesets
  4. The round robin consists of matches where each player competes in 28 matches
  5. The season concludes with a double elimination playoff tournament

What are Champs Points?

Champions Points (Champs Points) are awarded to players at the end of every Standard and Premier qualifying league season, based on where they place at the end of round robin play (see the table below) and additional Champs Points are awarded based on playoff performance (see the table below).

Round Robin Rank

Champs Points

1st

16

2ND

15

3RD

14

4TH

13

5TH

12

6TH

11

7TH

10

8TH

9

9TH

8

10TH

7

11TH

6

12TH

5

13TH

4

14TH

3

15TH

2

16TH

1

Playoff Finish Position

Champs Points

1st

8

2ND

4

3RD

2

4TH

1

For a Qualification Path Flowchart click the button below:

Still have questions? Email us at info@iatf.com.

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A collection of photos taken at the IATC 2022 photobooth!

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It was a whirlwind last couple of months planning, preparing for, and executing the International Axe Throwing Championships for 2022, and now it’s time to thank and reflect!

After a long hiatus due to COVID, we’re grateful that we could all get back to the friendly faces, the roar of the crowd, and the thunder of the axes this year in Toronto. If you didn’t make it to IATC this year, you were very missed, it was a homecoming unlike any other. Of course, the vibe was true to what we’ve all come to know and love about the axe-throwing community. It’s been said that there’s no other place in the world where axes and hugs fit so well together. Welcome to the IATF!

HISTORY IN THE MAKING

This year IATC saw some interesting firsts that highlight the growth and power of our sport.

More Women in the Final 32

For the first time in IATF history, there were more women competitors in the 256 throwers at IATC 2022 and in the final 32 on Sunday than ever before! Watch out, these women and more are bringing their skill and passion to the boards, and we couldn’t be more pleased!

Global Finalists

Even with COVID still presenting travel issues around the globe, we still saw participants, spectators and finalists come to Toronto from all over the world this weekend.

The Wilson Cup Goes to the USA

Of course, we can’t forget to mention that for the first time in history, the Wilson Cup belongs to our friends from across the border! Congrats Dave for taking the cup home this year!

IATC ADDITIONAL TOURNAMENT WINNERS

Over the course of four days filled with competition and camaraderie, we had many champions and we’re pleased to officially re-announce the winners of the week's events:

On Thursday and Friday, we hosted the Doubles Tournament, the Under 65 Tournament, and the Close But No Cigar Tournament at various BATL venues across Toronto. We can’t forget to give a big thank you to BATL Axe Throwing for providing the space and support for these tournaments!

THE WINNERS:

DOUBLES: Julio Romero & Rander Marquez
Congratulations Julio and Rander on your win!

UNDER 65: Jon Pelletier
Congrats Jon on your win!

CLOSE BUT NO CIGAR: Kelly Moylan
Congratulations on winning the tournament Kelly!

On Saturday, 4 BATL venues supported the IATC Round 2 tournament which pitted 256 throwers from around the world against each other for the chance to move onto the Finals. The excitement, and sometimes disappointment, was palpable. In the end, 32 players moved onto the final stages at BATL Pickering for the Finals!

IATC TOP 3 AND YOUR CHAMPION

Once again, the best axe throwers in the world took part in the IATF’s Finals matches on Sunday, further narrowing the field until there were only 3 remaining champions: Dave Cycon, Austin Agosti, and Cameron Dubrow! Congratulations!


We want to thank these players both for their dedication, passion for this sport, and the sportsmanlike way they conducted themselves! Here’s how it all turned out:

FIRST PLACE: Dave Cycon
Congratulations Dave, for a well-fought and long-awaited victory!

SECOND PLACE: Austin Agosti
Congratulations Austin! Your battle was epic!

THIRD PLACE: Cameron Dubrow
Congrats Cameron on such an outstanding achievement!

YOUR IATC SPONSORS

One final note is to let you all know that IATC 2022 would not have been possible without the generous support of our sponsors. We hope that you will all give them a big thank you with us as well!

Liquid Death
Beyond The Pale
White Claw
Woodhouse Ales
Sandbagger

We know we speak for everyone when we say how grateful we are to have had your support and generosity at this years IATC.

We also owe special thanks to all of the community, whether you attended in person or not because, without you, we would not be here to make these events happen! You’re all champions!


If you’re not already, follow us on Facebook (IATF), Instagram (@Interaxe), and Twitter (@inter_axe), since it won’t be long before we have news on next year’s IATC!

Still have questions? Email us at info@iatf.com.

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